Once Upon A Time

Cinderella, like Treasure Island, has been done over and over and over again. Only instead of the adaptations all drawing on a single original source, every culture has its own version, the earliest-known being found in ancient Greece. Some versions have one royal ball, some have three, some have a fairy godmother and one has a … Continue reading Once Upon A Time

It’s Good To Be King

Entertainment's Great Family has arrived. Turbulence seems to run in the Barrymore clan. Drew Barrymore's grandfather, John, was an incredibly respected actor (even his profile was highly renowned). He also suffered from alcoholism, to the point that he began to forget lines and gain weight. His relationship with his wife, Delores Costello disintegrated--she finally called … Continue reading It’s Good To Be King

Do You See What I See?

Good evening... (Well, it may not be evening when you read this, but you know how Hitchcock always said it on his TV show) Anyone who's familiar with the apartment life dynamic knows what happens when lots of people are literally living on top of each other: stories will accumulate. Lots of stories. Many of them can be … Continue reading Do You See What I See?

Show Me Some Attitude

Disclaimer: Save the Last Dance is not exactly a family-friendly film. It's not Showgirls or anything, but it's not G-rated either.  IMDb has a Parents' Guide if anyone feels cautious. There's something visceral about performing because there's so much emotion involved--it becomes part of a person's identity, and it's definitely a release. If that outlet is cut off for whatever … Continue reading Show Me Some Attitude

La Vie Gershwin

Curtain... Confession time: I have a teeny bit of dance training. For two years I studied tap, ballet, and jazz with the late, great Betty Gentry. I also got a crash course in hip-hop and swing dancing before my tour with the Continental Singers. Four to six hours of just choreography a day, in addition … Continue reading La Vie Gershwin

Why I Like the First “Pirates” Best

Have you seen the latest Pirates of the Caribbean yet? What did you think? If Leonard Maltin's review is any indicator, things aren't looking so good. Granted, the public is by no means tired of watching the adventures of Captain Jack Sparrow, and as long as a franchise makes money, new installments will keep coming. Personally, I lost interest … Continue reading Why I Like the First “Pirates” Best

X Marks the Spot

Swish, swish, swish... 🙂 There have been adaptations a-plenty of Robert Louis Stevenson's most famous work, Treasure Island. The entertainment world has produced over fifty for film and TV, over twenty-four major stage productions, six radio versions, five computer games, five musical scores, three audio books and two retellings. And a partridge in a pear … Continue reading X Marks the Spot

City of Secrets

Class differences seem to be the theme for this week (It was totally inadvertent, I promise). This time, we're off to Germany to see what lies beneath in the 1927 film, Metropolis, a harrowing and complicated story of veiled dystopia. On one hand, it is among the first feature-length science fiction movies and really raised the bar in … Continue reading City of Secrets

Reblog: Screen Guild Theatre July 4th Triple Feature

Happy Independence Day to all my American readers! Hope you like Aurora’s new post as much as I did. 🙂

Once upon a screen...

A special post honoring Independence Day with Screen Guild Theater radio adaptations of three patriotic classic movies. Enjoy!

Yankee Doodle Dandy
Starring:  James Cagney, Joan Leslie, Walter Huston, Jeanne Cagney, Richard Whorf, S.C. Sokol, Charles Irwin

A Yank in the R.A.F.
Starring:  Tyrone Power, Betty Grable, John Sutton, Pat O’Malley

Take a Letter, Darling
Starring:  Rosalind Russell, Cary Grant (in the part played by Fred MacMurray in the film version) and Edward Everett Johnson

russ cary

The Guild, Gulf Oil and CBS bring The Screen Guild Show to the air:

The Gulf Oil Corporation sponsored the first four seasons of The Screen Guild Show – from 1939 to the Summer of 1942. The program was called The Gulf Screen Guild Show for its first season, and The Gulf Screen Guild Theatre for Seasons Two through Four. The reasoning for the name change was simply a natural progression in the type of productions…

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That Other Hamilton Woman

And now to discuss one of the great ladies of the screen... Gone With the Wind is a notorious tale. Margaret Mitchell's 1936 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about the Civil War South was a massive success, and the 1939 movie is still the top box office earner of all time. Even those who haven't seen it … Continue reading That Other Hamilton Woman