Origins: Peter Rabbit

Heh. I don't know about anyone else, but I never thought any of Beatrix Potter's stories would translate well to the big screen, least of all Peter Rabbit. Not that Potter's stories are bad or anything--they're classic and charming--but they're all so short. Even The Tale of Pig Robinson is only about one-hundred twenty pages long with big … Continue reading Origins: Peter Rabbit

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Goooooood Morning, Vietnam!

Welcome, Robin fans... Robin Williams is a loved fella. For my part, I was a big Mork and Mindy fan as a very young child. At least as much as Mom and Dad would let me, anyway, but I did have the suspenders. Oh, yes. I wore those things as often as I could. I remember when … Continue reading Goooooood Morning, Vietnam!

Garbo At M-G-M

Once Greta Garbo came to America, the only studio she ever worked at was M-G-M. She was never loaned out, she never went freelance, and she didn't divide her time between the movies and the stage like many other actors of that era. M-G-M was Garbo's studio, and she knew how to use what it … Continue reading Garbo At M-G-M

Thicker Than Water

Monday was the seventy-fifth anniversary of the sinking of the U.S.S. Juneau, and among its dead were the five Sullivan brothers. The news horrified the American public, and caused the United States to officially ban immediate family members from serving in the same units in the Armed Forces, known as the Sole Survivor Act. The loss became … Continue reading Thicker Than Water

NOW: Dear Friend 2.0

We've seen the "Then," and now for the "Now"... By far, one of my favorite current-day screenwriters is the late Nora Ephron. She came by writing naturally, seeing as her parents both authored plays, books, screenplays, and the like. Before her death in 2012, she crafted films with deft and memorable dialogue, often collaborating with … Continue reading NOW: Dear Friend 2.0

Stage To Screen: Driving Miss Daisy

Driving Miss Daisy has been one of my favorite movies since the eighth grade. I don't remember what it was about the film that got me, but right from the first, I loved it. It's over twenty-five years later, though, and I've never read the play that it was based on until now. Written by … Continue reading Stage To Screen: Driving Miss Daisy

Jane and Edward

Presenting Miss Joan! Joan Fontaine wasn't a lady to be pigeonholed. She could be sweet, she could be romantic, and she could be steely. In the case of 1944's Jane Eyre, she was a mixture of all of these qualities and more, sharing scenes with Orson Welles, one of the most formidable figures in entertainment history. … Continue reading Jane and Edward

To Spencer, With Love

The relationship between Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy is the stuff of legend. They were together for twenty-six years, and while morally their relationship may raise some red flags, it was always good to see their love for each other every time they locked eyes. Almost twenty years after Tracy's death, Hepburn, along with many … Continue reading To Spencer, With Love

He Ain’t Heavy, Father, He’s My Brother

Time to talk about Spence and Kate! December of this year will be the one-hundredth anniversary of Father Flanagan's Boys' Home, better known as Boys Town. Father Edward J. Flanagan, an Irish priest working in Omaha, Nebraska borrowed $90 and sought to provide a home for homeless, neglected, or delinquent boys, where they could receive … Continue reading He Ain’t Heavy, Father, He’s My Brother

Strange Bedfellows

Mr. Breen, I presume... The thing that people talk about when it comes to the American home front during World War Two, besides rationing, war jobs, and scrap drives, is how crowded the cities were. Residents of Mobile, Alabama liked to say that all someone had to do was bend down to tie their shoe … Continue reading Strange Bedfellows