Page To Screen: Since You Went Away

There were a lot of films made about the American home front during the Second World War, but few are as sprawling or epic as David O. Selznik's 1944 movie, Since You Went Away. The story of a Midwestern family, the Hiltons, the film is based on a book of the same name by journalist Margaret Buell … Continue reading Page To Screen: Since You Went Away

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Close Quarters

Today we've got a free-for-all movie for CineMaven's Free For All Blogathon, and it's a doozy. We're back in Washington D.C., people. The war is still on, folks are still crammed into the city like sardines, and there's more craziness to be had. Only instead of an apartment building, we're checking in at the fanciest … Continue reading Close Quarters

Ma and Pa

Once upon a time, there was a king named Clark Gable. He sought a queen to live by his side, and found her in Carole Lombard. She wasn't his first queen, and he wasn't her first king, but they were each other's favorite by far. At least, that's the way most people know them. The … Continue reading Ma and Pa

Let Us Entertain You

We've touched before on the way Hollywood threw its collective self into the war effort (and we probably will again). Whether it was enlisting, going on bond tours, doing Red Cross work, volunteering at a canteen, doing special radio shows--Hollywood was busy. Of course, the stars also did camp shows and tours of hospitals. Only … Continue reading Let Us Entertain You

Extra Baggage

For the rest of his career, David O. Selznik tried and failed to recapture the tremendous success he enjoyed with Gone With the Wind, but even he took a breather and made smaller movies now and then. Not many, but he made them, and probably the most winsomely strange of the bunch was 1945's I'll Be Seeing … Continue reading Extra Baggage

Thicker Than Water

Monday was the seventy-fifth anniversary of the sinking of the U.S.S. Juneau, and among its dead were the five Sullivan brothers. The news horrified the American public, and caused the United States to officially ban immediate family members from serving in the same units in the Armed Forces, known as the Sole Survivor Act. The loss became … Continue reading Thicker Than Water

Guess Who’s Coming To Connecticut

It's well-known that food was a very real concern during the Second World War. There were many, many desperate and starving people all over the world. In Holland, for instance, people were chewing on tulip bulbs and making bread out of peas. England was better off, but since they depended so heavily on imports, things … Continue reading Guess Who’s Coming To Connecticut

Boys Town Revisited

Everyone knows (and is probably sick of) the way sequels, prequels, and remakes are such a big part of Hollywood's output nowadays. We've been down Reboot Road plenty of times just on this blog. Classic Hollywood was no different than today in terms of capitalizing on older properties, although the new-to-retread ratio was obviously different. … Continue reading Boys Town Revisited

Strange Bedfellows

Mr. Breen, I presume... The thing that people talk about when it comes to the American home front during World War Two, besides rationing, war jobs, and scrap drives, is how crowded the cities were. Residents of Mobile, Alabama liked to say that all someone had to do was bend down to tie their shoe … Continue reading Strange Bedfellows

In Old San Francisco

Anyone who has ever been to San Francisco, especially between the upper ends of Hyde Street and Market Street nearest the Bay, has probably seen (or at least walked over) the bronze compasses that commemorate the Barbary Coast Trail. The Barbary Coast was the stuff of legend in the nineteenth and early twentieth century with … Continue reading In Old San Francisco