Bird Is the Word

Here we go... One of Alfred Hitchcock's most infamous films is the 1963 chiller, The Birds. Following the strafing of a seaside town by angry, murderous birds, it's commonly attributed to Daphne du Maurier's novella of the same name. However, there's much more as to how the film came to be. Melanie Daniels (Tippi Hedren), … Continue reading Bird Is the Word

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Stage To Screen: Little Shop of Horrors

There's no getting around it: Little Shop of Horrors is an unusual musical. Anything with a carniverous talking plant is not going to be a typical garden-variety story (See what I did there? 😉 ). What's really unusual is that Little Shop of Horrors started out as a 1960 Roger Corman film, then became a stage musical in … Continue reading Stage To Screen: Little Shop of Horrors

I Want Torpedo Juice

Presenting Mr. Keaton... Although he's best known for his silent films, Buster Keaton had an extensive film career after talkies came in, right up until his death. One of his last films was 1965's How To Stuff A Wild Bikini. We've been here before, but this time we're going to take a closer look, if that's … Continue reading I Want Torpedo Juice

Communists Among Us

Hello, Ms. Lansbury... Gen X-ers like me and those who were born later most likely think of Angela Lansbury as Jessica Fletcher on Murder, She Wrote or as Mrs. Potts on Beauty And the Beast. Lansbury is a nice, motherly lady with scads of class and moxie. However, Lansbury does mix things up now and then, and when … Continue reading Communists Among Us

Erasing Lowell Thomas

Time to regale about Mr. Kennedy, although not as much as I would like to... It's hard to find a more legendary figure in Western history than T.E. Lawrence, and journalist, Lowell Thomas was instrumental in bringing him to the public's attention. He was the first to give Lawrence the name, "Lawrence of Arabia." Thomas … Continue reading Erasing Lowell Thomas

Send A Revival

Time to talk about Miss Simmons... As the Production Code became less and less of a thing in the late fifties and early sixties, movies took on more of an overt edge. Language and content standards began to be relaxed, and once-untouchable topics became fair game. One of the early films of the cinematic new … Continue reading Send A Revival

George’s Final Days

It's Mr. Hudson! Doris Day and Rock Hudson are a perennially favorite screen team. They only made three movies together, but they're all memorable and fun. The last of them was 1964's Send Me No Flowers, a tale of hypochondria, hysteria, and hilarity. George (Rock Hudson) has it tough. He may live in a perfect house with … Continue reading George’s Final Days

Stage To Screen: Pygmalion

The idea of a master proving his prowess via a supposedly hopeless case is an old, old tale, and one of its most famous modern iterations is George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion. First exhibited in Vienna, Austria in 1913, it follows Professor Higgins and his subject, Cockney flower girl Eliza Doolittle, as that august gentleman teaches … Continue reading Stage To Screen: Pygmalion

Poe and Price Together Again

It's October, of course, and time to get spooky. As those of you who have been around this blog know, I like me some Vincent Price, especially his Poe movies. Last year we looked at American International Pictures' The Fall of the House of Usher, and this year we'll see their follow-up, 1961's The Pit and the Pendulum. … Continue reading Poe and Price Together Again

Everybody Plays the Fool

The Cold War was a serious, intense time, but it was also ripe for parody and satire. By far, the most famous example of this is the 1964 Stanley Kubrick film, Dr. Strangelove, or, How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. Starring Peter Sellers and George C. Scott, it's an infamous and uncomfortably compelling … Continue reading Everybody Plays the Fool

Paris, Here We Come

Ladies, kindly remove your hats... The end of the nineteenth century and the dawn of the twentieth were busy times as far as inventions and innovations went. Air, land, sea or sky--nothing was too big to be conquered, and naturally there were daredevils impatient to push the envelope. In 1908, after cars had caught the … Continue reading Paris, Here We Come

Shamedown #6: How To Steal A Million

Over halfway through my Shamedown list, people. New to the blog and mystified about Shamedowns? Go here. Previous Shamedowns can be found here. Audrey Hepburn is one of my all-time favorite actresses. Her filmography wasn't as long as some peoples' (only thirty-four film credits), but she had good taste in movies, and must have been … Continue reading Shamedown #6: How To Steal A Million