Home Sweet Haunt

Mwahahaha... Even the dark house subgenre has its cliches. The jumpscare. The dark and stormy night. The literal skeletons (and maybe various body parts) falling out of closets. Lots of screaming. Oh, and let's not forget the Spend-the-Night-In-the-House-And-Win-Something trope. 1958's House On Haunted Hill ticks all these boxes, adding in a bit of camp and the … Continue reading Home Sweet Haunt

Everybody’s Habitual

Hello, Miss Parker... Eleanor Parker certainly got around in terms of the roles she played, and in my opinion one of the more unusual ones was that of Zosh in the 1955 film, The Man With the Golden Arm. Oh golly, it's a doozy. It's a little bit beatnik. It's a little bit Requiem For A Dream. In the … Continue reading Everybody’s Habitual

Into the Habit

One thing that's not often talked about when it comes to Audrey Hepburn's career is how varied her filmography really wasn't--she mostly played romantic leads or maybe women who were unconventional. There's nothing wrong with that, but as they say, variety is the spice of life, and like many actors, Hepburn enjoyed playing against type … Continue reading Into the Habit

Seven Reasons To See “Singin’ In the Rain”

I have seen 1952's Singin' In the Rain more times than I can count. I grew up on this movie. However, as blogging would have it, I never thought I would review it because everyone and their brother reviews it. Yet here I am. It's been a lonnnnng time since I've watched the film, and I … Continue reading Seven Reasons To See “Singin’ In the Rain”

Proud Olivia

Ms. de Havilland is back... In the nineteen-fifties, Olivia de Havilland was married and living in Paris with her husband and two children, but she still made films now and then. In 1958 she starred in The Proud Rebel opposite Alan Ladd. A somewhat gentle story for a western, the film follows a Confederate veteran as … Continue reading Proud Olivia

Stage To Screen: Gigi

The 1958 film, Gigi, is commonly thought to herald the end of the Golden Age of Musicals. Before that, however, it was a Broadway hit. Before that, it was a French film. And even before that, it was a novella by Colette. The story of wandering eyes and changing impressions is as light and airy … Continue reading Stage To Screen: Gigi

Page to Screen: The Diary of Anne Frank

If she had lived, Anne Frank would be ninety-one this year. Her diary, technically known in English as Anne Frank: The Diary of A Young Girl, was first published in the Netherlands in 1947. The diary has been translated into sixty-five languages, sold over thirty-five million copies and is one of the most widely-read books outside … Continue reading Page to Screen: The Diary of Anne Frank

Lucky Lindy

Seven years from now will be the one-hundredth anniversary of Charles Lindbergh's transatlantic flight. Isn't that amazing? It used to be that people could barely move while planes were in the air because of ballast, and now commercial flights have wifi and comfy seats with lots of legroom, not to mention weirdly catchy safety videos. … Continue reading Lucky Lindy

Finding Answers With Ben-Hur

Time to hit the books... Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ is quite the novel and quite the enticing story for filmmakers. Every time it's been brought to the screen it takes people's breath away with the emotion, the politics, and the relationships, all woven together with the life and ministry of Jesus. Its author, … Continue reading Finding Answers With Ben-Hur

Page To Screen: A Night To Remember

The late Walter Lord is kind of a legend among Titanic buffs and historians. When he wrote A Night To Remember, which was published in 1955, he basically inspired the public fascination with the ship that continues today. Pretty much every book written about the Titanic uses Walter Lord's work as a source because he's that OG. How did Lord … Continue reading Page To Screen: A Night To Remember

Fatima In Hollywood

Bom dia... The fifties are somewhere we've all been to in terms of Hollywood movies, and we know it was an interesting time in the film industry. Big bad television and blacklisting made the studios rather nervous, and subjects that were once avoided now seemed safe. Religion was one of those, and Christian-centered films of … Continue reading Fatima In Hollywood

Shamedown #9: Touch of Evil

Well, lookee what we have here...another Shamedown. Anyone who's new to the blog and is wondering what the heck this is all about, please visit Cinema Shame. Orson Welles's relationship with Hollywood was always a contentious one, but by the late nineteen-fifties, a few things were changing. A lot of the old guard executives had … Continue reading Shamedown #9: Touch of Evil

Shelley Makes A Statement

And here's Ms. Winters... I don't know about everyone else, but when I think of Shelley Winters, I think of a funny lady who also looks like she could pop someone, like a cross between Lucille Ball and Betty Hutton. When Winters played Petronella van Daan in 1959's The Diary of Anne Frank, it combined everything the … Continue reading Shelley Makes A Statement

Stage To Screen: Mister Roberts

They say that truth is stranger than fiction, and some life experiences beg to be made into stories. Mister Roberts is one of those. Originally a novel by Thomas Heggen, it was published in 1946, premiered as a play in 1948, and released as a film in 1955. The story takes place very late in the war. … Continue reading Stage To Screen: Mister Roberts