At the Very Beginning

Production Code Time... The onscreen and offscreen partnership of Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn is the stuff of legend, and it all started with the 1942 film, Woman of the Year. The story of two rival columnists, it's a classic battle of the sexes. Tess Harding (Katharine Hepburn) is an international affairs columnist for the New York Chronicle. … Continue reading At the Very Beginning

Advertisements

Janet and Meg

Time to talk about Ms. Leigh...  One of my favorite movies is 1949's Little Women. I can't remember the first time I saw it. Maybe it was elementary school? I don't know. Anyway, it's a sweet version of Louisa May Alcott's story and one I always like to revisit. Our lady of the weekend, Janet Leigh, plays … Continue reading Janet and Meg

A Woman Scorned

Welcome back, Miss de Havilland! One of the nicest things about blogging is that it invites people to branch out, and among the stars I'm enjoying learning more about is Olivia de Havilland. Prior to starting Taking Up Room, the only movies of hers I had seen were Gone With the Wind, Thank Your Lucky … Continue reading A Woman Scorned

A Song To Sing

Another talented composer of the twentieth century is Jerome Kern. His songs are graceful, elegant, and thoughtful, ranging from playful to poignant, and he frequently collaborated with such lyrical greats as Oscar Hammerstein, Dorothy Fields, E.Y. Harburg, Ira Gershwin, and Johnny Mercer. Kern's biopic, Till the Clouds Roll By was released at the end of 1946, … Continue reading A Song To Sing

King Cole

I'm more of an Irving Berlin fan than a Cole Porter fan, to be honest, but I still like quite a few Porter songs. They're very catchy and endlessly singable, many with graceful, almost operatic melodies. Porter's 1946 biopic, Night and Day, is a delightful, almost non-stop revue of Porter's catalogue, set against the backdrop of his … Continue reading King Cole

The Man Who Owns Broadway

Here's the first of three Broadway biopics. My dad is going to be so proud of me for this one. In 2017's National Classic Movie Day post, I mentioned that my family has watched Yankee Doodle Dandy every year on the Fourth of July since the eighties. Well, my dad still does, but the rest of us … Continue reading The Man Who Owns Broadway

Stage To Screen: Show Boat

Street corners. Tourist traps. Flatbed trailers. Any place is fair game for an entertainer to ply their craft as long as there's an audience. Or even if there isn't. When I was with the Continental Singers, we once did an impromptu mini-concert in an old folks' home in Nebraska while waiting for our bus's air … Continue reading Stage To Screen: Show Boat

Shamedown #3: The Stranger

Shamedown Numero Trés, and our first Orson Welles movie of the list. I've been told this film's not one of Welles's best, but I'm keeping an open mind. If anyone is wondering what on God's green earth a Shamedown is, please visit the folks at Cinema Shame. After Citizen Kane, Orson Welles never quite got the same amount of creative … Continue reading Shamedown #3: The Stranger

Origins: Dumbo

Historically, circuses were a way of exposing a largely hometown-bound public to exotic animals they would never see in the wild, and shows have always tried to outdo each other in spectacle and novelty. In 1941, Disney asked, "What could be more novel than a flying elephant?" and released its classic film, Dumbo. In 2019, Tim Burton … Continue reading Origins: Dumbo

Bela Lugosi Versus the Vampire

Film fest time... Bela Lugosi is best-known for playing Dracula in the 1931 Universal film. He played the role on Broadway as well, and he originated what we immediately think of when vampires come to mind (Not looking at you, Twilight.). Hauntingly slow speech. Clawed hands. A sweep of a cape. Bela Lugosi did it all first. Lugosi … Continue reading Bela Lugosi Versus the Vampire

Stage To Screen: Cry ‘Havoc’

Happy New Year, everyone! How were your holidays? My son has a few days of vacation left before the rat race starts again, and we're savoring these last little bits of carefree non-scheduled time. Lots of binging on DVDs, for one thing. And Sims 3. Anywhoo...  As we've talked about before, Hollywood had to get … Continue reading Stage To Screen: Cry ‘Havoc’

Dance, Vicky, Dance

Hello there... I don't know why I never saw The Red Shoes. TCM showed it several times during the brief period my family had cable, but I never watched it. Too distracted, I guess. Well, that's all changed now, so let's hop into this 1948 gem, shall we? The Red Shoes was based on a story by Hans … Continue reading Dance, Vicky, Dance