Stage To Screen: He Who Gets Slapped

Plenty of us film buffs, including me, are aware that 1924's He Who Gets Slapped was MGM's first movie. There were a few other films in production at the time of MGM's incorporation, but He Who Gets Slapped is the first movie made by MGM as a new distinct entity. What I didn't know until recently … Continue reading Stage To Screen: He Who Gets Slapped

The Farmer Takes A Wife

Here come the bride and groom... Here's our second post-wedding story in two weeks, and this time we're going silent with the 1926 film, The Canadian. I had heard of this movie but didn't know much about it, so when it came time to dive in I was pleasantly surprised. The film begins with Frank Taylor … Continue reading The Farmer Takes A Wife

Shamedown #10: The Phantom Of the Opera

Ah, 2019's next-to-last Shamedown. And another silent movie, but I'm not complaining. I like silent movies, and it is Lon Chaney, after all. If anyone would like to know what this Shamedown business is all about , please visit Cinema Shame. And now on with the show... Lots of people remember Lon Chaney, the Man … Continue reading Shamedown #10: The Phantom Of the Opera

You Say “Da,” I Say, “Nyet.”

Florence Vidor is apparently kind of an unknown quantity in film history; she's mainly remembered for her marriage to respected director King Vidor. Vidor had been instrumental in his wife's rise to fame, but in 1924 the two of them divorced and each carried on alone. One of Vidor's post-King movies was 1926's You Never Know … Continue reading You Say “Da,” I Say, “Nyet.”

Ten Hut

From the halls of Montezuma, to the shores of Tripoli... My uncle is a Marine. Well, he's not on active service, but they say a Marine is never really out, so he's technically still a Marine. He's also a Vietnam vet, and he always flies the Marine flag outside his house. So, I have a … Continue reading Ten Hut

I Vant To Be A Clone

Vampires are funny creatures in Gothic lore. They're very subjective in their looks; they can be everything from suave and debonair to repulsive and slimy, to smoldering and sparkling to just plain comical. Or all of the above. Either way, as we all know, they have fangs and they drink blood. Bela Lugosi is the … Continue reading I Vant To Be A Clone

Quintessential Pickford

Silent movies have really been growing on me lately. I'm always glad to find more of them, even though I don't always know what to look for and am still unfamiliar with many of the actors and crew. One silent-era player who's definitely not a mystery is Mary Pickford. To say this lady was and … Continue reading Quintessential Pickford

The Purrfect Crime

Meow... I always like working more silent movies into my film-watching experience, and while I wish I could be more deliberate about it, the silent films I do get to see are generally surprises. One of the nicest ones so far is 1927's The Cat and the Canary. Based on the successful John Willard play of the … Continue reading The Purrfect Crime

Sister, Sister

I don't know about anyone else, but D.W. Griffith isn't my fave. From what I've found out about him, Besides the fact that Griffith was a flaming racist, I think he's overhyped. Some believe he invented the epic (he didn't), the close-up (nope--that may have been George Albert Smith), and the use of big crowds … Continue reading Sister, Sister

Deals With Destiny

Silent movies are tough to find on Netflix, unless a person knows what to look for. Every once in a while, though, one will pop up, and for some reason, the decision-makers seem have a thing for Fritz Lang. 1921's Destiny is the second of his movies I've seen on the streaming service, and after Metropolis, I wasn't … Continue reading Deals With Destiny

Between Silence and Sound

Good evening... It's always fascinating to revisit the nascent stages of icons' careers, and Alfred Hitchcock is one of the most intriguing. Before we knew him as the director of Vertigo, The Birds, Psycho, and other perennial classics of cinema history, Hitchcock was plugging away at making films in his native Britain, starting with silents and changing with … Continue reading Between Silence and Sound

End of an Era

Long before MGM put his story on the screen, Florenz Ziegfeld was dipping his toe into Hollywood. The first film he produced was 1917's The Land of Promise. Starring Billie Burke, the film is a straightforward story of farmers and romance. It's also, unfortunately, lost. Other films were takeoffs of his stage shows, such as Rio Rita or Whoopee.  Only … Continue reading End of an Era

My First Lon Chaney Movie

It. Is. Time. I'll admit, until this blogathon came around, I hadn't seen any Lon Chaney movies, although I'd seen clips of him. I knew he was a pioneer of both film makeup and horror films, which inspire industry professionals such as Rick Baker to this day. During his life, Chaney was so iconic and … Continue reading My First Lon Chaney Movie