It’s Bobsled Time

Everyone enjoying the dog days of summer? Who doesn't love a good underdog story? In 1993 we got treated to one of the best in my opinion, Cool Runnings. Inspired by the real-life first Jamaican bobsled team, it's an enjoyable film about finding unlikely niches. Derice Bannock (Leon) is a teacher and track runner. He wants to … Continue reading It’s Bobsled Time

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Shamedown #6: How To Steal A Million

Over halfway through my Shamedown list, people. New to the blog and mystified about Shamedowns? Go here. Previous Shamedowns can be found here. Audrey Hepburn is one of my all-time favorite actresses. Her filmography wasn't as long as some peoples' (only thirty-four film credits), but she had good taste in movies, and must have been … Continue reading Shamedown #6: How To Steal A Million

The Man We Knew When

I don't know what it is with some directors that they like to remake their own films. Cecil B. DeMille remade The Ten Commandments, for instance. Granted, one version was silent and one had sound, but they were still basically the same film. And of course, there's George Lucas and Steven Spielberg, but they're more … Continue reading The Man We Knew When

Between Silence and Sound

Good evening... It's always fascinating to revisit the nascent stages of icons' careers, and Alfred Hitchcock is one of the most intriguing. Before we knew him as the director of Vertigo, The Birds, Psycho, and other perennial classics of cinema history, Hitchcock was plugging away at making films in his native Britain, starting with silents and changing with … Continue reading Between Silence and Sound

July is #CleanMovieMonth!

Just thought I’d let you all know about Tiffany and Rebekah’s new blogathon. I can’t participate fully, but in August I will be recapping all the Code movies I reviewed in July. So, if anyone’s interested, here’s the info!

pure entertainment preservation society

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Announcing #CleanMovieMonth!

PEPS is officially announcing that July is #CleanMovieMonth! Many months are dedicated to celebrating history or bringing awareness. #CleanMovieMonth is dedicated to both. It’s a month-long celebration of Code films, specifically cinema sealed during the Breen era (1934-1954). Frequent PEPS readers know that PEPS is always dedicated to Breen era films. However, during #CleanMovieMonth, we are inviting you to join the celebration, too!

Why is July #CleanMovieMonth?

 The idea of the Motion Picture Production Code was first announced by Martin J. Quigley at a meeting in Chicago in July of 1929, so the Code was really born in July. On July 15, 1934, the Code began to be enforced as the Production Code Administration, with Joseph I. Breen as its leader, was formed. Thus, July is dedicated to celebrating Code films and clean cinema!

How do I participate?

Watch only American films released between July 15, 1934, and…

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Stage To Screen: Something For the Boys

Happy Fourth of July, all! During World War Two, there was no shortage of entertainment that encouraged audiences to do their part and help the servicepeople. Movies, radio, magazines, Broadway...every platform was used to the fullest. Sometimes the results came off better than others, of course, and one example of the "others" is Something For the … Continue reading Stage To Screen: Something For the Boys

All the World’s A Stage

Happy birthday to Ms. de Havilland! I'll admit, while I'm very familiar with Olivia de Havilland in Gone With the Wind, I've never really had the opportunity to look at much of her other work. It's one of the reasons I love participating in blogathons--it's fun to explore new films and information. The 1937 film, It's Love … Continue reading All the World’s A Stage

Dinner and Serendipity

When I reviewed Christmas In Connecticut, Kristina from Speakeasy recommended 1944's Sunday Dinner For A Soldier to me. It just so happened that the film was already on my Amazon list, and lo and behold, I got it for Christmas. Funny how things work out. Anyway, the film is the story of a poor family who want to do their … Continue reading Dinner and Serendipity

Marrying In Haste

World War Two was a heady time, and on-the-fly decisions weren't uncommon. Like getting married, for instance. 1942 has one of the highest marriage numbers on record in the United States. Some of these couples had been together for a while, but whirlwind courtships weren't unheard of. Sometimes called "gangplank marriage" or "shoving-off marriages," they … Continue reading Marrying In Haste