Shamedown #7: Thunderbolt

It's time for another Shamedown, and another invitation to pay the Cinema Shame folks a visit if anyone's curious about this whole Shame thing. And now, onward... Last year's Shamedown #7 was my review of the William Wyler documentary, The Memphis Belle, in which he flew several missions with a bomber crew, documenting their reactions and the … Continue reading Shamedown #7: Thunderbolt

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I Feel Fine

Nice to see you, Mr. Goldblum... I'm really not surprised that Gill decided to host a Jeff Goldblum Blogathon. We used to have Follow Fridays With Jeff Goldblum on Twitter, where a bunch of us would post Goldblum gifs and wish each other a happy weekend and stuff like that (Goldblumers represent!). I figured it … Continue reading I Feel Fine

Dickensian Barrymore

Nice to see the Barrymores again... Before Gone With the Wind or even Selznik International Pictures, David O. Selznik was a producer at MGM. L.B. Mayer had a vendetta against Irving Thalberg's success and respect in Hollywood, so when Thalberg was out ill, Mayer installed several other producers at the studio to take away some of Thalberg's … Continue reading Dickensian Barrymore

Page To Screen: Julie & Julia

It's been ten years since Nora Ephron's swan song, Julie and Julia. It was an ambitious film for her and it also wasn't, because it features expected and loved Ephron trademarks of witty dialogue and deft character development. What's unusual for the Ephron canon is that Julie and Julia juxtaposes the lives of two unique … Continue reading Page To Screen: Julie & Julia

Quintessential Pickford

Silent movies have really been growing on me lately. I'm always glad to find more of them, even though I don't always know what to look for and am still unfamiliar with many of the actors and crew. One silent-era player who's definitely not a mystery is Mary Pickford. To say this lady was and … Continue reading Quintessential Pickford

The Show Must Go On

Some crazy, crazy stuff hit theaters during the Second World War. Audiences were receptive to it, as they were looking for an escape from worry or bad news. One of the craziest was 1943's Thank Your Lucky Stars. Warner Bros. not only crammed in every star it could, but many of them act delightfully out of character. … Continue reading The Show Must Go On

Joan Goes Noir-ish

And here's Miss Joan... After World War Two, it really got to be a thing for studio actors to turn free-agent, and it became way more common for actors to both produce and star in their own films. One of these was 1948's Hollow Triumph, which is also known as The Scar, and as The Man Who Murdered Himself. Produced by … Continue reading Joan Goes Noir-ish

At the Very Beginning

Production Code Time... The onscreen and offscreen partnership of Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn is the stuff of legend, and it all started with the 1942 film, Woman of the Year. The story of two rival columnists, it's a classic battle of the sexes. Tess Harding (Katharine Hepburn) is an international affairs columnist for the New York Chronicle. … Continue reading At the Very Beginning

Janet and Meg

Time to talk about Ms. Leigh...  One of my favorite movies is 1949's Little Women. I can't remember the first time I saw it. Maybe it was elementary school? I don't know. Anyway, it's a sweet version of Louisa May Alcott's story and one I always like to revisit. Our lady of the weekend, Janet Leigh, plays … Continue reading Janet and Meg

Shamedown #6: The Breakfast Club

Another Shamedown is upon us, and it's another teen angst-fest. First, though, if anyone would like to know what a Shamedown is, please have a look at Cinema Shame. Okeydokey, off we go... The late John Hughes was a master of the youth film. My personal favorite is Pretty In Pink, but I'm always interested in seeing his other … Continue reading Shamedown #6: The Breakfast Club

Stage To Screen: Mister Roberts

They say that truth is stranger than fiction, and some life experiences beg to be made into stories. Mister Roberts is one of those. Originally a novel by Thomas Heggen, it was published in 1946, premiered as a play in 1948, and released as a film in 1955. The story takes place very late in the war. … Continue reading Stage To Screen: Mister Roberts

A Woman Scorned

Welcome back, Miss de Havilland! One of the nicest things about blogging is that it invites people to branch out, and among the stars I'm enjoying learning more about is Olivia de Havilland. Prior to starting Taking Up Room, the only movies of hers I had seen were Gone With the Wind, Thank Your Lucky … Continue reading A Woman Scorned