Rita Hayworth and World War Two

Well, hello, Miss Rita... As we've talked about on this blog before, Hollywood threw itself into doing its part during the Second World War. All efforts were vastly appreciated, but some stood out more than others, and one of those was Rita Hayworth. In the early nineteen forties, Rita's star was on a rapid ascent, … Continue reading Rita Hayworth and World War Two

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Mr. Breen Goes To the Village

Welcome back, Mr. Breen! Although it's pretty gentrified nowadays, Greenwich Village has always had a reputation for counter-culturalism and being a haven for artists and other creative types. It's always been a tempting setting for a story, even during the Production Code Era, when an undiluted bohemian Village didn't exactly meet Mr. Breen's standards. 20th … Continue reading Mr. Breen Goes To the Village

Poe and Price Together Again

It's October, of course, and time to get spooky. As those of you who have been around this blog know, I like me some Vincent Price, especially his Poe movies. Last year we looked at American International Pictures' The Fall of the House of Usher, and this year we'll see their follow-up, 1961's The Pit and the Pendulum. … Continue reading Poe and Price Together Again

Shamedown #9: Arrival

Shamedown #9. Is that anything like Plan Nine From Outer Space? I hope not, although they're both sci-fi. Before we get started, as always, here's the link to Cinema Shame for those who need the Shamedown context. For past Shamedowns, look here. What if you could see both the beginning and the end of your life? That's the … Continue reading Shamedown #9: Arrival

Origins: A Star Is Born

They remade A Star Is Born. Again. The current version stars Lady Gaga (credited as her real name, Stefani Germanotta) portraying rising star Ally, while Bradley Cooper plays Jackson Maine, mega country star who helps Ally get her start, even as his own career is hitting the skids. If the story arcs the way its predecessors … Continue reading Origins: A Star Is Born

Page To Screen: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

One of the most iconic tales of American literature is The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Written by Washington Irving and originally published in 1820 as part of his Sketch Book, this story of ill-fated schoolteacher Ichabod Crane never fails to chill. It also never fails to find new life in various media. For those who … Continue reading Page To Screen: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

Dinner And A Murder

The dinner-turned-murder-mystery scenario is a pretty durable one, and in some cases it comes off better than in others. 1976's Murder By Death is one of the most memorable in my opinion, and we're going to dive on into it. Murder By Death was written by Neil Simon, and opens, literally, with the opening of a trunk. It's … Continue reading Dinner And A Murder

Origins: Little Women

Louisa May Alcott's semi-autobiographical novel, Little Women, has been a well-loved classic from the beginning. First published in 1868, with a sequel, Good Wives following in 1869, the saga came at a time when America was reeling in the aftermath of the Civil War. The book was both timely and timeless. It was also unusual … Continue reading Origins: Little Women

The Fighting WACs

One obvious side effect of war, especially a global one, is the shortage of men at home, and World War Two was no different. Countless Hollywood fixtures, whether cast or crew, enlisted or were drafted into the armed forces, leaving studio rosters a little thin for the time being. Naturally, this gave rise to more … Continue reading The Fighting WACs

Adjustments, All Sorts

Well, hello, Ms. Bacall... When life is in turmoil, people need release wherever they can find it, and the 1957 film, Designing Woman was one such break for Lauren Bacall. She called it "a nice, light comedy," and though she didn't think so initially, it was just what she needed during one of the toughest times … Continue reading Adjustments, All Sorts