Adjustments, All Sorts

Well, hello, Ms. Bacall... When life is in turmoil, people need release wherever they can find it, and the 1957 film, Designing Woman was one such break for Lauren Bacall. She called it "a nice, light comedy," and though she didn't think so initially, it was just what she needed during one of the toughest times … Continue reading Adjustments, All Sorts

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Announcing the Unexpected Blogathon!

Did you ever watch a film or a TV show that you knew nothing about, wasn't expecting to see, and ended up really liking? Or, were you ever disappointed in something you were expecting to love? I know I have. Now's your chance to tell the blogging world about it! Your picks can be from … Continue reading Announcing the Unexpected Blogathon!

Joseph Cotten and the Mercury Players

Mr. Cotten, I presume. Joseph Cotten was an unusual actor. Sure, he was handsome and funny and could play a variety of roles, but he was also a late bloomer when it came to film. Born in 1905, he didn't make his stage debut until 1930 and his film debut in 1938. The latter is … Continue reading Joseph Cotten and the Mercury Players

And Now For Something Completely Different

Who's up for a little classic intrigue? Sometimes when a chance presents itself, there's nothing to do but take it (Within reason, of course). In the early nineteen-forties, Fred MacMurray was a durable rom-com guy, but 1944 brought him a new kind of opportunity--a role in Billy Wilder's Double Indemnity. Based on a story by James M. … Continue reading And Now For Something Completely Different

Ingrid’s Casablanca

Welcome back, Ms. Bergman! What hasn't been said about Casablanca? What hasn't been asked about Casablanca? This is a film that's been parsed, analyzed, memorialized, quoted, parodied, and collected more homage than most films in history, with the exception of Citizen Kane and The Wizard of Oz, of course. What's left to be said? Plenty. It's a classic film that we … Continue reading Ingrid’s Casablanca

Fun(!) With Eschatology

Lee's getting scary today... I read a book in college, The Thirteenth Generation, that said Hollywood produced a glut of anti-child horror movies during the nineteen-seventies as a way of telling Gen-Xers we weren't wanted. Rosemary's Baby. Children Of the Corn. It's Alive. Poltergeist. All featuring evil murderous poppets who annihilate anyone standing in their way. In the … Continue reading Fun(!) With Eschatology

Relationships 101

It's not uncommon for movies to be based on novels, or great events in history, but a movie based on a self-help book?! It's been done more than once, but it always seems a little weird. Even when the book is as successful and overly-accessible as Greg Behrendt and Liz Tucillo's He's Just Not That Into … Continue reading Relationships 101

Hostage Hotel

Even after his mobility became limited, Lionel Barrymore had a busy career right up to his death in 1954. While he was with MGM for decades, he was loaned out on many occasions, one of the later ones being the 1948 film, Key Largo. Barrymore's role is definitely memorable, and shows his power as an actor even … Continue reading Hostage Hotel

Dinner Is Served

The Barrymores have returned, y'all. MGM had a thing for ensemble films in the early thirties. Why have one box office draw when more just makes everything better? John and Lionel Barrymore got to be in on a few of these extravaganzas, and one of the most well-known is 1933's Dinner At Eight. Like their earlier hit, Grand … Continue reading Dinner Is Served

Clean With Breen

So it's come to this... As promised, I'm recapping all the Breen-friendly films I reviewed in July for Tiffany and Rebekah's #CleanMovieMonth blogathon. How did they meet the Breen Code standards? Let's find out: It's Love I'm After (1937) This film played it dangerously. Basil and Joyce were so passionate I thought they were a … Continue reading Clean With Breen