Garbo At M-G-M

Once Greta Garbo came to America, the only studio she ever worked at was M-G-M. She was never loaned out, she never went freelance, and she didn't divide her time between the movies and the stage like many other actors of that era. M-G-M was Garbo's studio, and she knew how to use what it … Continue reading Garbo At M-G-M

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Ninotchka’s Guide To Paris

Garbo was definitely not known for being a comedienne. Oh, no. This screen queen was in deadly earnest. Dramatic.  Serious. Always, dahling. As time went on, though, M-G-M tried revamping Garbo's image, which is why it took thirteen years for her to make her first comedy, and that was the 1939 film, Ninotchka. Three Russians, Iranoff, … Continue reading Ninotchka’s Guide To Paris

Ballet Garbo

Garbo is in the house! One of the wacky things about the studio system was that an actor or actress could be conscripted into certain roles in films, whether they liked it or not. Depending on the studio or on their status as a star, refusing a role could mean hurting one's career or risking … Continue reading Ballet Garbo

NOW: Dear Friend 2.0

We've seen the "Then," and now for the "Now"... By far, one of my favorite current-day screenwriters is the late Nora Ephron. She came by writing naturally, seeing as her parents both authored plays, books, screenplays, and the like. Before her death in 2012, she crafted films with deft and memorable dialogue, often collaborating with … Continue reading NOW: Dear Friend 2.0

THEN: Dear Friend…

Get ready for the "Then" in the Then and Now Blogathon! Who's up for a little shopping? In 1937, the play, Illatszertár, or Parfumerie premiered at the Pest Theatre in Budapest. Written by Miklós László, the play followed the story of a cosmetics shop in Budapest, and in particular two of the clerks, Amalia Balash and George Horvath. The … Continue reading THEN: Dear Friend…

Guess Who’s Coming To Connecticut

It's well-known that food was a very real concern during the Second World War. There were many, many desperate and starving people all over the world. In Holland, for instance, people were chewing on tulip bulbs and making bread out of peas. England was better off, but since they depended so heavily on imports, things … Continue reading Guess Who’s Coming To Connecticut

Observe the Ramen

Who doesn't like ramen? The instant kind is the food of college students and those on budgets. And everyone else, because we just can't leave ramen behind. There are a million ways to make it and dress it up, not to mention there are tons of different brands and restaurants out there. To the Japanese, … Continue reading Observe the Ramen

Jane and Edward

Presenting Miss Joan! Joan Fontaine wasn't a lady to be pigeonholed. She could be sweet, she could be romantic, and she could be steely. In the case of 1944's Jane Eyre, she was a mixture of all of these qualities and more, sharing scenes with Orson Welles, one of the most formidable figures in entertainment history. … Continue reading Jane and Edward

To Spencer, With Love

The relationship between Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy is the stuff of legend. They were together for twenty-six years, and while morally their relationship may raise some red flags, it was always good to see their love for each other every time they locked eyes. Almost twenty years after Tracy's death, Hepburn, along with many … Continue reading To Spencer, With Love

What’s There Is Cherce

Katharine Hepburn was famously athletic for most of her life. She played sports of all kinds and loved swimming in the ocean. It was only a matter of time before a role came along that would show off her abilities, and that was the title character in 1952's Pat and Mike. Pat Pemberton is a widow … Continue reading What’s There Is Cherce