Put the Blame On Mame

Here's Mr. Ford... Our guest of honor sure had a way of landing some interesting roles, and one of the most iconic films he did by far was 1946's Gilda. It might be more iconic for Rita Hayworth than Glenn Ford, but it's a tossup as to who makes the bigger impression. The film was tumoultous … Continue reading Put the Blame On Mame

Thirty-one Days Until the Distraction Blogathon

One month to go until the Distraction Blogathon, people. One month until we talk about the twists, turns, dead ends, rabbit holes, and all the other things that grip us when we see a good movie. Thanks heaps to everyone who's signed up so far! I'm so glad to see all the enthusiasm for this … Continue reading Thirty-one Days Until the Distraction Blogathon

Joni Finds Her Feet

Biopic time... Biopics are very common--we all know this. However, it's not often that the subject of a biopic actually stars in their own film. Joni Eareckson Tada is one of the few. 1979's Joni was based on her book of the same title and covers the first five years or so after Tada's life-changing accident. … Continue reading Joni Finds Her Feet

The Rest of the Movie

Happy Silent Movie Day! Anyone who's ever watched a documentary about film history, especially of MGM, has probably seen a shot of John Gilbert lunching with a group of his fellow stars. That clip comes from 1928's Show People, a fantastic Marion Davies vehicle that's beloved by film buffs and geek bait for historians. Peggy Pepper … Continue reading The Rest of the Movie

My Favorite Lord of the Rings Character

Love it, like it, or not, it's pretty safe to say no one's indifferent to Lord of the Rings, and people are pretty precious about their favorite characters. Remember the uproar when Tom Bombadil was left out of the movies? It's still a slightly touchy subject because there are LOTR fans who are that committed. Me, … Continue reading My Favorite Lord of the Rings Character

Anne Meets Mrs. Fanning

Hello, Ms. Bancroft... Anne Bancroft was, of course, a busy lady of both stage and screen, and every once in a while those two planes collided, such as in the BBC production of Paddy Chayefsky's The Mother. The play is set in the Bronx, New York in 1954 and deals with family, aging, and accepting reality. … Continue reading Anne Meets Mrs. Fanning

It Takes All Kinds

We all have unpopular opinions, and film is such a subjective topic that there's gonna be division somewhere (Last Jedi, anyone?). Ergo, the idea of coaxing a few secrets out into the open is fraught with intrigue. Here are two of my possibly unpopular opinions, and there are plenty more where these came from. *Impish … Continue reading It Takes All Kinds

A Matter of Hormone Activity

Mr. Lawford's back... It's always nice to unearth a treasure or two in the movie blogging business, and it can be fun to find some turkeys, too. Then there are those movies that straddle both sides, like 1952's You For Me. A straight-ahead rom com, it's nothing if not ambitious. The tone of this movie is set … Continue reading A Matter of Hormone Activity

Oz Goes Highland

Ye Scots, wha wish auld Scotland well! One of the most popular characters on the Christy TV show was, by far, Doctor Neil MacNeill, and one of the most popular show arcs was the triangle between Christy (Kellie Martin), Neil and preacher David Grantland (Randall Batinkoff). Neil was wonderfully played by Stuart Finlay-McLennan, who seemed to burr with the … Continue reading Oz Goes Highland

Fredric the Prefect

Blogathon time... It's always interesting to delve into a performer's very early career, and while Fredric March was a longtime veteran of the screen, sound films were still finding their footing. One of many movies he made in 1932 was the racy Cecil B. DeMille epic, The Sign of the Cross. The film starts in … Continue reading Fredric the Prefect

Too Many Mikes

Van's back, y'all... Who else thinks air travel is fascinating? I do. I like learning about the history of commercial travel because it's interesting to see how things have changed or not changed over the years. Add in a fun romantic story, though, and it's even better. 1951's Three Guys Named Mike is that kind of movie. … Continue reading Too Many Mikes

Announcing the Distraction Blogathon!

MacGuffins. Red herrings. Dangling carrots. Bait-and-switch. Whatever. We all know how movies mess with our heads. And these distractions come in all shapes and sizes. We think Dorothy's ticket home is meeting the Wizard in the Emerald City until Professor Marvel accidentally leaves her behind. We might watch the Pink Panther movies thinking that somewhere … Continue reading Announcing the Distraction Blogathon!

Esther’s New Suit

Hello, Miss Esther... One of the fun things about Esther Williams' movies is seeing all the ways MGM devised to get her into the water, and so far I think my favorite is the 1949 film, Neptune's Daughter. It's not only a fun movie, but it's the point in Esther's career in which she started … Continue reading Esther’s New Suit

Less Phantom, More Opera

Surprise blogathon time... From the 1925 Lon Chaney classic to the beloved Andrew Lloyd Webber leviathan of a musical, The Phantom of the Opera is a perennial showstopper with its soaring music, swinging chandelier, and all-around creepiness. Sandwiched among the many onscreen iterations is the 1943 version starring Claude Rains as the Phantom with Nelson … Continue reading Less Phantom, More Opera

The Man With No Name

Yee haw... Ah, 1964's Per Un Pugno Di Dollari, better known as A Fistful of Dollars. I've never seen it until now, but I always felt as if I had since it's pretty notorious. If Stagecoach is the Bela Lugosi of westerns, A Fistful of Dollars is Christopher Lee with a generous dash of Kung Fu. Or something like … Continue reading The Man With No Name