Jane and Edward

Presenting Miss Joan! Joan Fontaine wasn't a lady to be pigeonholed. She could be sweet, she could be romantic, and she could be steely. In the case of 1944's Jane Eyre, she was a mixture of all of these qualities and more, sharing scenes with Orson Welles, one of the most formidable figures in entertainment history. … Continue reading Jane and Edward

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To Spencer, With Love

The relationship between Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy is the stuff of legend. They were together for twenty-six years, and while morally their relationship may raise some red flags, it was always good to see their love for each other every time they locked eyes. Almost twenty years after Tracy's death, Hepburn, along with many … Continue reading To Spencer, With Love

What’s There Is Cherce

Katharine Hepburn was famously athletic for most of her life. She played sports of all kinds and loved swimming in the ocean. It was only a matter of time before a role came along that would show off her abilities, and that was the title character in 1952's Pat and Mike. Pat Pemberton is a widow … Continue reading What’s There Is Cherce

Boys Town Revisited

Everyone knows (and is probably sick of) the way sequels, prequels, and remakes are such a big part of Hollywood's output nowadays. We've been down Reboot Road plenty of times just on this blog. Classic Hollywood was no different than today in terms of capitalizing on older properties, although the new-to-retread ratio was obviously different. … Continue reading Boys Town Revisited

He Ain’t Heavy, Father, He’s My Brother

Time to talk about Spence and Kate! December of this year will be the one-hundredth anniversary of Father Flanagan's Boys' Home, better known as Boys Town. Father Edward J. Flanagan, an Irish priest working in Omaha, Nebraska borrowed $90 and sought to provide a home for homeless, neglected, or delinquent boys, where they could receive … Continue reading He Ain’t Heavy, Father, He’s My Brother

Strange Bedfellows

Mr. Breen, I presume... The thing that people talk about when it comes to the American home front during World War Two, besides rationing, war jobs, and scrap drives, is how crowded the cities were. Residents of Mobile, Alabama liked to say that all someone had to do was bend down to tie their shoe … Continue reading Strange Bedfellows

They’re He-ere

The idea of life on other planets has always intrigued and fascinated some people. Me, I've never been one to believe in extraterrestrials. If they're out there, let them stay out there, and if they don't exist, then okay. I don't really care one way or the other, but when it comes down to it, … Continue reading They’re He-ere

Somebody’s Watching Me

Here's June... So many of the early stars got their start on the stage, such as on Broadway or in vaudeville, and June Allyson was no different. She went from working in Vitaphone shorts and in the choruses of various Broadway shows to her first lead in the successful 1941 musical, Best Foot Forward. M-G-M soon bought … Continue reading Somebody’s Watching Me

Page To Screen: The Fall of the House of Usher

Very few have done more for Gothic literature than Edgar Allan Poe. His writings about spooky happenings, death, and decay, fit right in with the Victorian mindset, which was all too familiar with death. He is so iconic that other Goth and horror writers can only follow in his wake (Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley and the … Continue reading Page To Screen: The Fall of the House of Usher

In Old San Francisco

Anyone who has ever been to San Francisco, especially between the upper ends of Hyde Street and Market Street nearest the Bay, has probably seen (or at least walked over) the bronze compasses that commemorate the Barbary Coast Trail. The Barbary Coast was the stuff of legend in the nineteenth and early twentieth century with … Continue reading In Old San Francisco