Bird Is the Word

Here we go... One of Alfred Hitchcock's most infamous films is the 1963 chiller, The Birds. Following the strafing of a seaside town by angry, murderous birds, it's commonly attributed to Daphne du Maurier's novella of the same name. However, there's much more as to how the film came to be. Melanie Daniels (Tippi Hedren), … Continue reading Bird Is the Word

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The Sunshine Blogger Award

OK, I know I said I was going to post something for Gabriela's Daphene du Maurier Blogathon today, but that was before I got nominated by Sally of 18 Cinema Lane for the Sunshine Blogger Award. Wasn't that nice of her? Sally's wonderful blog can be found here. Thank you, Sally! As always, this sort … Continue reading The Sunshine Blogger Award

Origins: Yesterday

We've all heard of the Beatles. That goes without saying. Today's bands have to be some kind of something to be compared to them, and even if they're not, it's not uncommon to bask in Beatle glow (Bay City Rollers, anyone?). But what if someone woke up in a world where no one had heard … Continue reading Origins: Yesterday

Travels With Papa

Summertime, and de livin' is easy... Ah, summer. And ah, vacation season. Unless one is a too-cool-for-school teenager who's suddenly allergic to Mom and Dad, especially when there's someone cute to impress. Katherine Heigl in her pre-Grey's Anatomy days takes this to the extreme in the 1994 father-daughter comedy, My Father the Hero. It's an unusual movie, especially … Continue reading Travels With Papa

Reading Rarities: The Art of Overeating

Plenty of Americans have contentious relationships with food in that we have to be moderate about something we have more than an abundance of. We want to overindulge, but we know we shouldn't, so life can be made up of mental games and conditioning in order to maintain a proper relationship with what we put … Continue reading Reading Rarities: The Art of Overeating

Gable Talks

The King is back... We all have to start somewhere, and one of Clark Gable's first roles was in 1931's The Painted Desert. It's so early in Gable's career that he doesn't get billing of any kind. It was a loaded part for Gable, because it was literally the first time he spoke onscreen. Not only was … Continue reading Gable Talks

Monsters Unite

The crazy world of Hammer-Amicus is back... We all know that the Amicus filmmakers love their monsters. A lot. Crazy a lot. So why not go nuts? Instead of one or two monsters, how about a whole slew? That's what 1981's The Monster Club is about, and if one can get past the bouncer, there's plenty of … Continue reading Monsters Unite

Shamedown #5: I Don’t Know How She Does It

Hard to believe we're halfway through the year already, but Shamedown #5 is upon us. For anyone who would like to know what a Shamedown is, please visit Cinema Shame. It's fitting that I picked this movie for one of this year's Shamedowns, because a couple of months ago I got a job with a neighboring … Continue reading Shamedown #5: I Don’t Know How She Does It

Hallowed Ground

Seventy-five years ago... Charlie Brown cartoons were usually cute and funny, but they were often poignant. One of my favorites from the 1980s was the little gem, What Have We Learned, Charlie Brown? Originally broadcast on May 30, 1983, it's the continuation of the adventures Charlie Brown, Linus, Peppermint Patty, Marcie, Woodstock and Snoopy had in the … Continue reading Hallowed Ground

Private Diva

Hello, Ms. Russell... Rosalind Russell was nothing if not versatile, and like a lot of stars during the petering out of the studio era, went free agent. Along with her husband, Fredrick Brisson, she even produced a few films for her own studio, Independent Artists, such as 1953's Never Wave At A WAC. Shot at Walt Disney … Continue reading Private Diva

Page To Screen: Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen's single most famous novel is, of course, Pride and Prejudice. All six of her novels are famous, but there's something about P&P that puts it above the others. It's been adapted more than any other Austen novel, that's for sure. I toyed with the idea of asking the Twitterverse which versions of Pride and Prejudice were their … Continue reading Page To Screen: Pride and Prejudice