Waiting to Blink

We all know that airports are funny places. They're worlds of their own. As long as one stays within their confines, they're a way of going somewhere while not going somewhere. It's almost like being in purgatory without dying. Obviously, airports are not places where we spend a whole lot of time, but what if … Continue reading Waiting to Blink

The Trouble With Joe Gillis

Mr. Holden is back, and he's going to a familiar place... Sunset Boulevard is well-trod territory for film buffs, film students, and film lovers in general. It's quoted, imitated, and referenced constantly. Who hasn't heard, "I'm ready for my closeup." at least once? The 1950 film is not only important to movie aficionados, but for William … Continue reading The Trouble With Joe Gillis

Reading Rarities: Pocket Guide To the Apocalypse

We've had an unusual amount of death-related stuff this month, and now we'll be talking about the end of the world. It's quite an April we're having here. Don't worry, though--this Reading Rarity will be fun. Here's hoping, anyway... The end of the world is a touchy subject. It's also the title of that one … Continue reading Reading Rarities: Pocket Guide To the Apocalypse

Have Ye the Body?

Today's subject matter is a bit on the macabre side, and may not be for everyone. On the other hand, it's compelling, so if anyone is into unusual history, well, you've come to the right place... On this day in 1865, at 7:22 AM, President Abraham Lincoln died of a gunshot wound in a house … Continue reading Have Ye the Body?

Shamedown #3: The Stranger

Shamedown Numero Trés, and our first Orson Welles movie of the list. I've been told this film's not one of Welles's best, but I'm keeping an open mind. If anyone is wondering what on God's green earth a Shamedown is, please visit the folks at Cinema Shame. After Citizen Kane, Orson Welles never quite got the same amount of creative … Continue reading Shamedown #3: The Stranger

Remembering Rick Elias

This past Tuesday, Rick Elias passed away from glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer. He was sixty-four. I grew up on his music, mainly through his work with one of my all-time favorite songwriters, the late Rich Mullins. Elias made numerous contributions to contemporary Christian music, or CCM, as it's called. Elias didn't release … Continue reading Remembering Rick Elias

Bette’s Secret Win

Welcome back, Ms. Davis... 1939 is deservedly called the single greatest year in motion picture history, because more classics were produced in that period than in any other. The juggernaut was, of course, Gone With the Wind, but there were many, many movies that stood out more quietly. One of these was Dark Victory. It was an unusual subject … Continue reading Bette’s Secret Win

In Love and War

Hello, Ms. Day... I'll admit, up until a few days ago the first and only time I saw The Pajama Game was my freshman year of high school, when it was our spring musical. Back then, I thought it was fun and different--I had been used to musicals like Fiddler On the Roof and Annie, so "Steam Heat" and "Hernando's Hideaway" … Continue reading In Love and War

Page To Screen: Sherlock Holmes

Like Robin Hood, Ebeneezer Scrooge and Ichabod Crane, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes is another literary heavyweight with a lengthy filmography. Holmes is not only a captivating character, but is widely credited with influencing today's use of forensic sciences. The first Sherlock Holmes story, A Study In Scarlet was published in Beeton's Christmas Annual … Continue reading Page To Screen: Sherlock Holmes