Dinner And A Murder

The dinner-turned-murder-mystery scenario is a pretty durable one, and in some cases it comes off better than in others. 1976's Murder By Death is one of the most memorable in my opinion, and we're going to dive on into it. Murder By Death was written by Neil Simon, and opens, literally, with the opening of a trunk. It's … Continue reading Dinner And A Murder

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Origins: Little Women

Louisa May Alcott's semi-autobiographical novel, Little Women, has been a well-loved classic from the beginning. First published in 1868, with a sequel, Good Wives following in 1869, the saga came at a time when America was reeling in the aftermath of the Civil War. The book was both timely and timeless. It was also unusual … Continue reading Origins: Little Women

The Fighting WACs

One obvious side effect of war, especially a global one, is the shortage of men at home, and World War Two was no different. Countless Hollywood fixtures, whether cast or crew, enlisted or were drafted into the armed forces, leaving studio rosters a little thin for the time being. Naturally, this gave rise to more … Continue reading The Fighting WACs

Adjustments, All Sorts

Well, hello, Ms. Bacall... When life is in turmoil, people need release wherever they can find it, and the 1957 film, Designing Woman was one such break for Lauren Bacall. She called it "a nice, light comedy," and though she didn't think so initially, it was just what she needed during one of the toughest times … Continue reading Adjustments, All Sorts

Shamedown #8: Like Water For Chocolate

Mmmmm...chocolate. Chocolate mixed with shame might be a different story, though. Here's the link to Cinema Shame for those of you who would like to know why this post is called a Shamedown. Previous Shamedowns can be found here. The idea of a cook's mood going into their food is certainly nothing new. It's a classic move … Continue reading Shamedown #8: Like Water For Chocolate

Origins: Lizzie

We've all heard the playground song, "Lizzie Borden took an axe, and gave her mother forty whacks," right? I don't know if kids still sing that, but if they do, I have to wonder if they know where the chant came from, or who Lizzie Borden was. For those who are unfamiliar with her, Lizzie … Continue reading Origins: Lizzie

Announcing the Unexpected Blogathon!

Did you ever watch a film or a TV show that you knew nothing about, wasn't expecting to see, and ended up really liking? Or, were you ever disappointed in something you were expecting to love? I know I have. Now's your chance to tell the blogging world about it! Your picks can be from … Continue reading Announcing the Unexpected Blogathon!

Joseph Cotten and the Mercury Players

Mr. Cotten, I presume. Joseph Cotten was an unusual actor. Sure, he was handsome and funny and could play a variety of roles, but he was also a late bloomer when it came to film. Born in 1905, he didn't make his stage debut until 1930 and his film debut in 1938. The latter is … Continue reading Joseph Cotten and the Mercury Players

Stage To Screen: Fiddler On the Roof

This really ought to be a "Page To Stage To Screen" look, because Fiddler On the Roof is based on a collection of short stories entitled Tevye And His Daughters, or Tevye the Dairyman, written by Sholem Aleichem, whose real name was Solomon Naumovich Rabinovich. First published in Yiddish in 1894, they are set in the Ukranian village of … Continue reading Stage To Screen: Fiddler On the Roof

And Now For Something Completely Different

Who's up for a little classic intrigue? Sometimes when a chance presents itself, there's nothing to do but take it (Within reason, of course). In the early nineteen-forties, Fred MacMurray was a durable rom-com guy, but 1944 brought him a new kind of opportunity--a role in Billy Wilder's Double Indemnity. Based on a story by James M. … Continue reading And Now For Something Completely Different