Reading Rarities: The Art of Overeating

Plenty of Americans have contentious relationships with food in that we have to be moderate about something we have more than an abundance of. We want to overindulge, but we know we shouldn't, so life can be made up of mental games and conditioning in order to maintain a proper relationship with what we put … Continue reading Reading Rarities: The Art of Overeating

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Gable Talks

The King is back... We all have to start somewhere, and one of Clark Gable's first roles was in 1931's The Painted Desert. It's so early in Gable's career that he doesn't get billing of any kind. It was a loaded part for Gable, because it was literally the first time he spoke onscreen. Not only was … Continue reading Gable Talks

Monsters Unite

The crazy world of Hammer-Amicus is back... We all know that the Amicus filmmakers love their monsters. A lot. Crazy a lot. So why not go nuts? Instead of one or two monsters, how about a whole slew? That's what 1981's The Monster Club is about, and if one can get past the bouncer, there's plenty of … Continue reading Monsters Unite

Shamedown #5: I Don’t Know How She Does It

Hard to believe we're halfway through the year already, but Shamedown #5 is upon us. For anyone who would like to know what a Shamedown is, please visit Cinema Shame. It's fitting that I picked this movie for one of this year's Shamedowns, because a couple of months ago I got a job with a neighboring … Continue reading Shamedown #5: I Don’t Know How She Does It

Hallowed Ground

Seventy-five years ago... Charlie Brown cartoons were usually cute and funny, but they were often poignant. One of my favorites from the 1980s was the little gem, What Have We Learned, Charlie Brown? Originally broadcast on May 30, 1983, it's the continuation of the adventures Charlie Brown, Linus, Peppermint Patty, Marcie, Woodstock and Snoopy had in the … Continue reading Hallowed Ground

Private Diva

Hello, Ms. Russell... Rosalind Russell was nothing if not versatile, and like a lot of stars during the petering out of the studio era, went free agent. Along with her husband, Fredrick Brisson, she even produced a few films for her own studio, Independent Artists, such as 1953's Never Wave At A WAC. Shot at Walt Disney … Continue reading Private Diva

Page To Screen: Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen's single most famous novel is, of course, Pride and Prejudice. All six of her novels are famous, but there's something about P&P that puts it above the others. It's been adapted more than any other Austen novel, that's for sure. I toyed with the idea of asking the Twitterverse which versions of Pride and Prejudice were their … Continue reading Page To Screen: Pride and Prejudice

A Song To Sing

Another talented composer of the twentieth century is Jerome Kern. His songs are graceful, elegant, and thoughtful, ranging from playful to poignant, and he frequently collaborated with such lyrical greats as Oscar Hammerstein, Dorothy Fields, E.Y. Harburg, Ira Gershwin, and Johnny Mercer. Kern's biopic, Till the Clouds Roll By was released at the end of 1946, … Continue reading A Song To Sing

Broadway Bound 2019: Day Three

We've come to the third and final day of our blogathon, and there's more wonderfulness in store. The lights have flickered, signaling the end of Intermission, and now the curtain rises on Act Three... Love Letters To Old Hollywood's mini Marilyn tribute comes to a close with a look at the underrated 1960 gem, Let's Make Love. … Continue reading Broadway Bound 2019: Day Three

Broadway Bound 2019: Day Two

We've had a stellar opener (see Day One here), and now to continue the festivities. Off we go, Broadway lovers... Love Letters To Old Hollywood starts us off again with a review of 1955's The Seven Year Itch. Yes, that's the one where Marilyn's dress goes floof. 18 Cinema Lane brings on the 1940 film, Little Nellie Kelly, in which (spoiler alert!) … Continue reading Broadway Bound 2019: Day Two

King Cole

I'm more of an Irving Berlin fan than a Cole Porter fan, to be honest, but I still like quite a few Porter songs. They're very catchy and endlessly singable, many with graceful, almost operatic melodies. Porter's 1946 biopic, Night and Day, is a delightful, almost non-stop revue of Porter's catalogue, set against the backdrop of his … Continue reading King Cole