Before Errol Flynn

Remake Fever in Hollywood is definitely not a new thing, and one of the great parts about being a film blogger is finding out movies I thought were stand-alone works actually weren't. One of these is The Sea Hawk. Mentioning this title usually brings to mind Errol Flynn, but it turns out that he wasn't the … Continue reading Before Errol Flynn

Run, Truman, Run

We all know that reality TV is ubiquitous nowadays. Any remotely unique scenario is potential gold, from building a tiny house to raising nineteen children to looking for The One. However, there's plenty of fakeness and staginess going on, even in the seemingly simplest of ideas. It's a pretty safe bet us normal folks don't … Continue reading Run, Truman, Run

And Then There Were Three…Liebsters

Unlike Hollywood, blogger awards season is year-round, and lo and behold, I've won my third Liebster, courtesy of the lovely Gill at Realweegiemidget Reviews. Thank you so much, Gill! It's always nice to be appreciated and to pass it on. If anyone is unitiated as to the responsibilities of accepting a Liebster Award, the recipient's … Continue reading And Then There Were Three…Liebsters

A Tartu By Any Other Name

Hello again, Mr. Donat... I was going to review The Magic Box for Maddy's 'thon, but Amazon un-Primed it, so it's getting saved for later. Plan B was 1943's The Adventures of Tartu, an intriguing though very rough-around-the-edges tale of espionage and near-romance. I had no idea what to expect going in, but I figured I'd give Tartu a … Continue reading A Tartu By Any Other Name

Announcing the Atticus and Boo Blogathon!

In 1960, To Kill A Mockingbird released, and movie audiences beheld something unique in film history, although they wouldn't have known it then: The last few minutes of the movie are one of two brief times Gregory Peck and Robert Duvall would share a screen. It was Robert Duvall's first movie. As Boo Radley, he … Continue reading Announcing the Atticus and Boo Blogathon!

Proud Olivia

Ms. de Havilland is back... In the nineteen-fifties, Olivia de Havilland was married and living in Paris with her husband and two children, but she still made films now and then. In 1958 she starred in The Proud Rebel opposite Alan Ladd. A somewhat gentle story for a western, the film follows a Confederate veteran as … Continue reading Proud Olivia

Stage To Screen: Gigi

The 1958 film, Gigi, is commonly thought to herald the end of the Golden Age of Musicals. Before that, however, it was a Broadway hit. Before that, it was a French film. And even before that, it was a novella by Colette. The story of wandering eyes and changing impressions is as light and airy … Continue reading Stage To Screen: Gigi

Gettin’ Prehistoric, Bu-ddy

I was going to review The Mortal Storm this week, but it seems a wee bit too depressing and on the nose, so I decided to save it for later and go for something light. 1992's Encino Man was the winner. I got it a few weeks ago from the DVD rack at WinCo, and now seemed like … Continue reading Gettin’ Prehistoric, Bu-ddy

Live And Let Binge

Here we are again. The lockdown is pretty much over. Social distancing isn't really a thing unless someone's at a protest (or something more destructive, and in that case, all the shame on them). Worship services are finally starting to come back. Sorta. There's almost no point in going to meeting if there's no singing … Continue reading Live And Let Binge

Reading Rarities: Joan Of Arc In Her Own Words

No one is ever quite indifferent to Joan of Arc once they've found out about her. She's been called a witch, she's been called crazy, she's been called a mystic. Some people think her Voices were actual Saints and others don't. Either way, we all know Joan's a towering figure to many, and because of … Continue reading Reading Rarities: Joan Of Arc In Her Own Words

Shorter Basil

Mr. Rathbone, I presume... Basil Rathbone had the forceful act down pat. If he wanted to, he could take or throw a punch, hold his own with a sword, or bore a hole in his opponent with his eyes. In the 1935 film, Anna Karenina, where Rathbone played Alexei Alexandrovitch Karenin, the rejected husband of the … Continue reading Shorter Basil

Five Reasons To See “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari”

When people talk about horror or silent movies, the 1920 German expressionist masterpiece, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari inevitably comes up. There's been a lot said about it (Movies Silently and Silent-ology are two excellent examples), which I don't feel like I can add much to, but I will say this: Even people who don't normally … Continue reading Five Reasons To See “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari”

The Tower By the Bay

Are you prepared? The seventies were a weird time in Hollywood. Studios were operating on tighter budgets, so the high output of a couple of decades earlier was unheard of. Instead, studios opted for fewer films with big ensemble casts and higher octane production values, and one of these was 1974's The Towering Inferno. Like … Continue reading The Tower By the Bay